What Needs to be Translated on a Cosmetic Label?

The labelling process for cosmetic products is relatively straight forward, even for products seeking to enter the European Market that may be manufactured or produced outside the European Union. One of the most fundamental aspects of the labelling process to note is that a product can only be labelled and released onto the European Market after all relevant safety assessments and tests have been made and after the Notification process and work on the Product Information File has been conducted and reviewed by the Responsible Person. Though this blog will focus on the aspects a cosmetic label that need to be translated, it will also outline the other items which must be included on the label too.

Items on a Cosmetic Label to be Translated

i. Product Function: The product function is the intended or advertised effect of the product. This must be translated into the native language of each country the product is being introduced to. (Note: This is not the case, however, if the product presentation already shows its function clearly)

ii. Precautions for Use: Precautions for use include the methods for using the product and the possible actions to avoid when using the product (e.g. ‘Avoid contact with eyes’). Similar to product function, these must be included in the native language of each country the product is being introduced to. In instances where it is not possible to include this information on the product’s label, it may be included on the product’s packaging or on an enclosed leaflet. To do this, however, the product must be marked with an ‘open book’ symbol.

Other Items to be Included

i. Full commercial name of product

ii. List of product ingredients (to be matched exactly to product information file)

iii. Expiry date

iv. Name and address of Responsible Person

v. Name and address of manufacturer

vi. Batch number

vii. Product’s country of origin

viii. Nominal quantities (the amount, in weight or volume, of each ingredient contained within the product, excluding products less than 5 grams/millilitres, free samples, and single-application packs)

For more information on labelling cosmetic products, or to enquire about Obelis’ Responsible Person and compliance consultancy services, feel free to contact us today.

Disclaimer: The label example given above is only for general information and cannot be applied automatically to any product.

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